Wednesday, August 6, 2014
Festoon wtih Flowers and Fruit 1660s Jan Davidsz de Heem

Festoon wtih Flowers and Fruit 1660s Jan Davidsz de Heem

Wednesday, July 9, 2014
Evening, Owens Lake, California by Albert Bierstadt
 

Evening, Owens Lake, California by Albert Bierstadt

 

Tuesday, February 25, 2014 Monday, August 5, 2013

Lollapalooza 1991 from C3 Presents on Vimeo.

lollapalooza:

Highlights from the first Lollapalooza in 1991. 

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Know What You Can Control and What You Can’t

Happiness and freedom begin with a clear understanding of one principle: Some things are within our control, and some things are not. It is only after you have faced up to this fundamental rule and learned to distinguish between what you can and can’t control that inner tranquility and outer effectiveness become possible.

Within our control are our own opinions, aspirations, desires, and the things that repel us. These areas are quite rightly our concern, because they are directly subject to our influence. We always have a choice about the contents and character of our inner lives.

Outside our control, however, are such things as what kind of body we have, whether we’re born into wealth or strike it rich, how we are regarded by others, and our status in society. We must remember that those things are externals and are therefore not our concern. Trying to control or to change what we can’t only results in torment.

Remember: The things within our power are naturally at our disposal, free from any restraint or hindrance; but those things outside our power are weak, dependent, or determined by the whims and actions of others. Remember, too, that if you think that you have free rein over things that are naturally beyond your control, or if you attempt to adopt the affairs of others as your own, your pursuits will be thwarted and you will become a frustrated, anxious, and fault-finding person.

from The Art of Living  The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness

Epictetus A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Friedrich Hundertwasser Austrian painter and architect 1928-2000  

Read more at source:

(Source: artandblog.blogspot.com)

Thursday, December 16, 2010

projectgutenberg:

Like Shakespeare Jane Austen knew the inner nature by intuition, and had learned its outward expression by observation. Character not only affects the speech of each one of her men and women, but determines their destiny and shapes the plot of the story.

- Clara H. Whitmore, Women’s Work in English Fiction (1909) [full text]

(Happy birthday, Jane!)

I say it is necessary to be a voyant, make oneself a voyant. The Poet makes himself a voyant by a long, immense and rational derangement of all the senses. All the forms of love, suffering, and madness. He searches himself. He exhausts all poisons in himself and keeps only their quintessences. He is responsible for humanity, for animals even. He will have to make his inventions smelt, touched, and heard. A language must be found. Moreover, every word [utterance] being an idea, the time of a Universal Language will come! Arthur Rimbaud  (via thewww)
Saturday, November 13, 2010

Dangers of long term loneliness

 In recent years, sociologists and epidemiologists have begun studying the long-term effects (Direct PDF link) of loneliness. It turns out to be really dangerous. We are social primates, and when we’re cut off from the social network, we are more likely to die from just about everything (but especially heart disease). At this point, the link between abstinence and social isolation is merely hypothetical. But given the extensive history of group drinking—it’s what we do when we come together—it seems likely that drinking in moderation makes it easier for us develop and nurture relationships. And it’s these relationships that help keep us alive.

http://lifehacker.com/5684996/what-alcohol-actually-does-to-your-brain-and-body

Monday, November 8, 2010
Viktor Emil Frankl 
His best-selling book, Man’s Search for Meaning (published under a different title in 1959: From Death-Camp to Existentialism, and originally published in 1946 as trotzdem Ja zum Leben sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager), chronicles his experiences as a concentration camp inmate and describes his psychotherapeutic method of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most sordid ones, and thus a reason to continue living. Frankl was one of the key figures in existential therapy and a prominent source of inspiration for humanistic psychologists.
(wikipedia)
"For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour… To put the question in general terms would be comparable to the question posed to a chess champion, "Tell me, Master, what is the best move in the world?" There simply is no such thing as the best or even a good move apart from a particular situation in a game…One should not search for an abstract meaning of life."

Viktor Emil Frankl

His best-selling book, Man’s Search for Meaning (published under a different title in 1959: From Death-Camp to Existentialism, and originally published in 1946 as trotzdem Ja zum Leben sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager), chronicles his experiences as a concentration camp inmate and describes his psychotherapeutic method of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most sordid ones, and thus a reason to continue living. Frankl was one of the key figures in existential therapy and a prominent source of inspiration for humanistic psychologists.

(wikipedia)

"For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour… To put the question in general terms would be comparable to the question posed to a chess champion, "Tell me, Master, what is the best move in the world?" There simply is no such thing as the best or even a good move apart from a particular situation in a game…One should not search for an abstract meaning of life."